The Kate Edger Department of Mathematics


Optical diffusion tomography

cl-optical-diffusion-tomography
Cross section of the head of a newborn. The DOT image indicates internal bleeding. DOT imaging can be done continuously, which is not possible with magnetic resonance imaging or similar techniques.

Optical diffusion tomography (DOT) is mathematically similar to electrical impedance tomography, although the latter is usually a less ill-posed problem. In biomedical applications of DOT, monochromatic near infrared light is directed to tissue and the typically weak transmitted light is measured. Based on these measurements, the spatial distribution of optical properties of tissue are reconstructed. The optical properties depend on several factors. Most importantly, the absorption coefficient with different wavelengths depends on the oxygenated and deoxygenated blood concentrations. This phenomenon facilitates applications that are related to energy metabolism in tissue, such as brain. Other applications include the early detection of a haemorrhage in newborn babies and some cancers.

We have been mostly focusing on the computational and modelling topics. Recently, most of the effort has been devoted to model reduction and model error related issues. In the near future, the implementation of all the developed computational and modelling methods are to be applied to small animal and clinical studies.

 

Researchers at The University of Auckland

 

Other collaborators

  • Doctor Ville Kolehmainen
    University of Eastern Finland, Department of Physics and Mathematics.
  • Tanja Tarvainen
    University of Eastern Finland, Department of Physics and Mathematics.
  • Professor Simon Arridge
    University College London, Department of Computer Science.
  • Politecnico di Milano
    University College London, Department of Computer Science.
  • Professor Gianluca Valentini
    University College London, Department of Physics.
  • Athinoula A
    Massachusetts General Hospital.
  • Maria Franceschini
    Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging.
  • Professor David Boas
    Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging.
  • Doctor Ilkka Nissila
    Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Biomedical Engineering.